Economics

Comments Off on It’s useful to forget (some) things.

It’s useful to forget (some) things.

Over on Twitter, the excellent Tom Chivers (find his book here) is curious about how the human brain works: “Is there a specific name for the cognitive bias that makes us remember weather forecasts the few times they’re wrong… but not all the times when it’s right?” Good question, and one I embarrassingly can’t think Read More

Comments Off on Why are public health professionals burning their credibility?

Why are public health professionals burning their credibility?

We should always evaluate the risks and benefits of efforts to control the virus. In this moment the public health risks of not protesting to demand an end to systemic racism greatly exceed the harms of the virus. — Jennifer Nuzzo If I could offer one piece of advice to a profession fighting its greatest Read More

Comments Off on Woke Capital is not your friend

Woke Capital is not your friend

It is unconscionable that @StarWars has not yet tweeted the words #BlackLivesMatter — Chris Taylor A Bugman is your typical big left leaning city dweller… Everything about his personality and life is not defined by who he is, but by what he buys and his consumerist tendencies — Urban Dictionary Businesses don’t make money by Read More

Comments Off on New paper: Fatalism and COVID-19

New paper: Fatalism and COVID-19

I appreciate this isn’t what the three regular readers of this site have come to expect, but I am going to briefly halt the flow of half-thought-out musings to direct your attention to some of my academic work, and one new paper in particular. The study is on the effect people’s beliefs about COVID-19 have Read More

Comments Off on Memento Mori

Memento Mori

You are going to die, and so is everyone you love. Unless you are part of the extraordinarily lucky generation whose lives overlap with the time when cellular immortality is finally invented, “the price of life is death”. That does not mean that life is meaningless or short; when Beetham said those words he was Read More

Comments Off on Just because there’s a law.

Just because there’s a law.

4,400 years ago Urukagina, ruler of the Mesopotamian city-state of Lagash, set down the first known code of law. The full text is lost to history, but cuneiform script on a clay cone tells us that, among other provisions, it made clear that the powerful could not force others to sell them their possessions. From Read More

Comments Off on Venezuela and the Blairites

Venezuela and the Blairites

I haven’t been writing as much as I should recently, and I think that’s largely because there’s simply been too much to write about. Every time I get a piece halfway to the finish line, something else drags my attention away. Traditionally, this problem has resolved itself when somebody writes something so monumentally wrongheaded that I Read More

Comments Off on The Unspoken Backstop

The Unspoken Backstop

The Withdrawal Agreement has foundered, and beneath the froth and fury of Parliamentarians blaming the prime minister, the opposition, the European Research Group, the European Union, and indeed each other for the deal’s undoing, the rocks of the Irish backstop await the next unfortunate attempting to pass. The prevailing consensus is that there can be Read More